The Royal Box in 1950

Although The Royal Box is a private facility and entry to the Royal Enclosure has always been by invitation only, Royal Ascot provides an opportunity for spectators to watch The Royal Family enjoying a day’s racing, one of their best-loved pastimes. 
 

The first Royal Procession was instituted by King George IV in 1825 and now takes place on every day of Royal Ascot. The opportunity for everyone to see The Queen and other members of The Royal Family arrive in state in their open carriages and then relaxing with their guests in The Royal Box is part of the unique atmosphere that makes this meeting so special and memorable
 
 
 
The Queen arriving on Surprise, 1961
 
The British Royal Family has always had a special affinity with Ascot Racecourse. The Queen often rode out at Ascot Racecourse before she hung up her riding boots and Royal Ascot is, and always has been, the only “Royal” race meeting in Great Britain. It was Queen Anne who first chose it as the ideal place to race horses in 1711. It was the presence and patronage of royalty, as well as some of the finest racing in the country, that brought the most fashionable people in society, as well as the huge crowds, to Ascot.
 
 
The Royal Enclosure
 
The highlight of the season for centuries. The first Royal Box was commissioned by King George IV in 1822 from George Nash – architect of Buckingham Palace. The small enclosure erected around it would eventually become the Royal Enclosure. Admission was naturally, and strictly, limited to those with a personal invitation from His Majesty. The Royal Enclosure remains to this day one of Ascot’s most famous icons and perfectly encapsulates the glamour and excitement of this unique racecourse.
 

Find out more about Ascot Racecourse and Royal Ascot at www.ascot.co.uk

 

 

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